DIY: Random Acts of Kindness Cards

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I’m a big believer in being kind.  I like to do kind things for strangers, and for people that I know.  Not only does it make my heart happy, I like to think it makes others happy, too.  There are so many things in the world that we can’t control, but we can choose what we put forth into the world – and I choose kindness.

While brainstorming my newest design team project for crescendoh.com, I was inspired by the Ordinary Sparkling Sentiments stamp set, and just knew they’d make some great Random Acts of Kindness cards (RAK cards).  I’ve already given some of these cards away, and will carry the rest with me daily so I can brighten someone’s day when a situation arises or inspiration strikes.  You can leave your finished cards just about anywhere…

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Some people carry RAK cards that say something like “Smile – you’ve been gifted with a Random Act of Kindness”, which they hand to the person who is receiving their good deed, but in this case the cards themselves are the act of kindness and speak for themselves.  You can certainly give them along with something else, but they’re nice on their own as well.

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There are a million ways you can make, customize, and embellish your RAK Cards – here’s how I made mine:  I started with Strathmore Watercolor paper, and cut the sheets into smaller pieces.  I created the painted surface by first brushing on a mixture of Pearlescent Liquid Acrylic, walnut ink, and water.  While the color mixture was still wet I loosely brushed on some watered-down gesso, and then sprinkled on a bit of metallic gold or silver powder (Schmincke) while the cards were still wet.  Don’t worry if your color application isn’t uniform, or if your gesso blends with the color and/or drips off the edge of the cards.  I applied my color and gesso very freely, and allowed the two surface treatments to blend together.

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Once the card dried I stamped a quote onto the card using black StazOn ink.  On some cards I also stamped another image, like a flower, a heart, or a butterfly.

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The last step, before handing out these RAK cards and brightening someone’s day, is embellishment.  I embellished my cards by punching out shapes, adding ribbon hangers and attaching rhinestones, but the possibilities are endless.  Consider using beautiful scraps of paper or lace, beads, or buttons to embellish your RAK cards.

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Where would you leave these cards if you were to give them to strangers, friends, and family?  Would you pair them with another gift?  I’d love to hear your ideas and suggestions…

Warm regards,
Melody

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12 Comments

  1. Posted November 3, 2011 at 10:19 am by Anne | Permalink

    Melody, what a delightful idea! I also enjoy doing small acts of kindness for strangers… it always makes me feel better about people to have that quick happy connection. I’d never thought about giving out cards though!

    • Posted November 3, 2011 at 7:17 pm by Melody | Permalink

      Anne,
      Even something simple and small can change someone’s day for the better. I’m glad you’re out there spreading kindness, too.
      Thank you for commenting!
      Melody

  2. Posted November 3, 2011 at 10:46 am by Jani N. Howe | Permalink

    Melody, I often have occasions to give some of my cards to those in doctor’s offices, or my favorite grocery checker, etc. and I either leave them at the ‘front desk’ or hand a nicely wrapped packet of them to the person and say, “Just because you are special to me!” Jani Howe

    • Posted November 3, 2011 at 7:16 pm by Melody | Permalink

      Jani,
      Thank you for commenting and sharing! That’s a very kind practice…
      Melody

  3. Posted November 7, 2011 at 8:59 pm by Yolanda | Permalink

    Thank you for finding me on Twitter! I love this post! Will definitely be sharing this with my monthly art group. What a great way to give back.

    • Posted November 7, 2011 at 9:45 pm by Melody | Permalink

      Yolanda,
      My pleasure! I’m so glad you like the RAK cards, and am glad to hear you’re going to share the project with your art group. Wonderful that you’ll be putting good out in to the world!
      Melody

  4. Posted November 8, 2011 at 9:29 am by Jen Clark | Permalink

    I LOVE this idea, Melody!!! And they are beautiful!

    • Posted November 8, 2011 at 7:42 pm by Melody | Permalink

      Jen,
      Thank you for your kind words, and for commenting! I’m so glad you like them…
      Melody

  5. Posted November 8, 2011 at 12:45 pm by Katherine Regier | Permalink

    I like to stick them in library books, or between books at a library, or on grocery shelves. My favorite thing to do is a “hit and run” – just drop them in a grocery cart while the person shopping is looking the other way; tuck them in a coat pocket in a garment rack at a show or museum. I’ve even tucked them into people’s coat pockets or purses when they were talking to me but otherwise distracted.

    • Posted November 8, 2011 at 7:40 pm by Melody | Permalink

      Kathy,
      Great ideas! I’m a fan of placing cards in or around books, and on grocery shelves, too. I’ll have to prepare myself for a grocery cart drop – sounds like fun! Wow, you’re practically a RAK ninja! :o
      Melody

  6. Posted November 9, 2011 at 4:25 pm by Beth Nielsen | Permalink

    I LOVE THESE; saw that Michelle had one & would love to talk with you about getting some of these for holiday gifts. I know where you sit!
    :o)

    • Posted November 9, 2011 at 8:23 pm by Melody | Permalink

      Beth,
      I’m glad you like the RAK card, and would be glad to chat about making you some.
      Thank you for commenting!
      Melody

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