Buried Treasure: Surface Treatments Revisited!

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Today’s special Wednesday post is in honor of the treasure hunt that Seth Apter is hosting on his blog.  It’s called Buried Treasure, and he invites participating bloggers to share an older post on their site – one that newer readers might’ve missed, and that first-time visitors to the blog might enjoy.  So if you’re visiting my blog today for the first time, welcome!  I hope everyone enjoys seeing this post for the first or second time.

Here’s the original post, as published last year:

This blog post is a bit of a departure, since I usually share finished projects.  You know – cards, collages, paper butterflies, altered metal cans – things of that nature.  Today’s offering is an artistic experiment, and my sample grid is the “finished product”.  It will serve as a resource for me, and I’m hoping it will inform and inspire you as well, dear readers.

In the interest of keeping my muse on her toes I decided I needed some time to play, so I set up an artistic exploration zone in the kitchen.  I laid down some plastic to protect from spills, covered that with paper towels, and laid out a bunch of goodies – things like walnut ink, Schmincke dry metallic gouache, liquid acrylics, dried flower pollen, Twinkling H20’s, small plastic cups, brushes, and watercolor paper.

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I began by taping a 16-section grid onto a sheet of watercolor paper with 1/4″ masking tape.  I didn’t measure – just kind of eyeballed it. The taped lines helped keep my different concoctions from bleeding or slopping over into the next section, but they were only temporary.  (I pulled up the masking tape dividers after everything had dried.)  Next, I drew this same grid pattern onto a piece of scratch paper.  I made notes of what items I combined in each section so I’d be able to replicate that look in the future if desired.

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I moved through the grid, section by section.  Sometimes I just laid down one product – sometimes I combined two or more.  I took notes, enjoyed playing, and smiled when hubby came by and commented that I looked like a mad scientist working on an experiment in her laboratory.

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Once the grid lines had been pulled up, I used number stamps and black StazOn ink to stamp a number into the lower left corner of each section.  Finally, I wrote a numeric list of what I did in each section on the back of my experimental grid.  If I need a reminder of what products I used and/or how I applied them, I can simply flip over my grid and look at the number corresponding to that section on my grid!

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Here are some of my favorite sections/results/looks.  Please keep reading for a complete list of what I used on all sixteen sections, and how I applied it – below.

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#3 Walnut ink, brushed on in a circular motion, and gold & silver Schmincke powder.

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#4 Walnut ink, water, and pink liquid acrylic mixed and then brushed on.

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#7  Tiger lily pollen mixed in Diamond Glaze and brushed on.  I’d plucked the pollen off some tiger lilies years ago, thinking it might make an interesting look, but it didn’t knock my socks off.  It was worth trying, though!

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#8  Walnut ink, silver Schmincke, and water brushed on thickly – the lighter side was blotted with paper towel.

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#13  Acrylic ink with raw, undiluted walnut ink crystals – allowed to set a few minutes, then blotted with paper towel.

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#14  Acrylic ink brushed on, blotted, dotted with candle wax, and the right half brushed with walnut ink.

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#16  Acrylic ink with Schminke powder sprinkled on – not mixed or blended.

My notes for all 16 sections:
1.  Plain walnut ink, brushed on
2.  Walnut ink dabbed on with brush, blotted
3.  Walnut ink, brushed on circularly, and gold & silver Schmincke powder sprinkled on and blended
4.  Walnut ink, water, and pink liquid acrylic mixed and then brushed on
5.  Gold Schmincke in Golden Soft Gel Gloss, brushed on
6.  Tiger Lily pollen in Golden Soft Gel Gloss, brushed on
7.  Tiger lily pollen mixed in Diamond Glaze and brushed on
8.  Walnut ink, silver Schmincke, and water brushed on thickly – left side blotted with paper towel
9.  Green Twinkling H20’s brushed on
10.  Green Twinkling H20’s with walnut ink brushed on and blended
11.  Purple liquid acrylic
12.  Purple liquid acrylic with walnut in brushed on and blended
13.  Acrylic ink with raw, undiluted walnut ink crystals – allowed to set a few minutes, then blotted
14.  Acrylic ink brushed on, blotted, dotted with candle wax, and the right half brushed with walnut ink
15.  Acrylic ink brushed on and blotted – right half brushed with Golden Acrylic Ground for Pastels. When the right half dried, drawn on with pencil, gel pen, black ink pen, and colored pencil
16.  Acrylic ink with Schminke powder sprinkled on – not mixed or blended

I hope you’ve enjoyed taking a peek at my artistic experiment.  Please let me know if you have any questions, and please feel free to share some of your favorite products and/or surface treatments!  Also, please let me know if you’re interested in seeing additional experiments from time to time, or if you prefer “finished project” posts.

Warm regards,
Melody

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12 Comments

  1. Posted July 11, 2012 at 9:40 am by Jo Murray | Permalink

    A treasure indeed Melody. I love seeing a process.

    • Posted July 11, 2012 at 10:13 am by Melody | Permalink

      Jo,
      I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Thanks for commenting!
      Melody

  2. Posted July 11, 2012 at 11:18 am by Jani N. Howe | Permalink

    Melody, I always enjoy seeing how other artists work! One never knows where an idea will come from. I enjoy seeing finished work, but it often leaves many questions about “how did she do that”, so explanations are always handy! Also, loved the info about your class making the news!

    • Posted July 11, 2012 at 1:14 pm by Melody | Permalink

      Jani,
      Thank you for stopping by and commenting. I’m glad you enjoed both the surface treatments post and the newspaper article!
      Melody

  3. Posted July 11, 2012 at 12:38 pm by Denise | Permalink

    Have to confess that I read this rather quickly so I could get to the pictures. Which explains why “Twinkling H2Os” became “Twinkies”. First thought was, now that’s my idea of a day of art and then realized that consumption of said culinary confection does not occur anywhere in the process. Oh well, still great to see how you approached the project!

    • Posted July 11, 2012 at 1:15 pm by Melody | Permalink

      Denise,
      Ha! Yes – Twinkies are optional, but why not? Whatever works for you. 🙂
      Melody

  4. Posted July 11, 2012 at 1:08 pm by LA Smith | Permalink

    Great post. Thank you for digging it up!

    • Posted July 11, 2012 at 1:16 pm by Melody | Permalink

      LA Smith,
      Thank you – my pleasure!
      Melody

  5. Posted July 11, 2012 at 1:22 pm by Kim Henkel | Permalink

    Loved this! Thanks for sharing it…. again (or I probably wouldn’t have found it)

    • Posted July 11, 2012 at 1:27 pm by Melody | Permalink

      Kim,
      My pleasure. I’m so glad you enjoyed it!
      Melody

  6. Posted July 11, 2012 at 7:52 pm by elle | Permalink

    This is a great study and the grid format is brilliant!

    • Posted July 11, 2012 at 8:51 pm by Melody | Permalink

      Elle,
      Thank you-I’m glad you like the post!
      Melody

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